Difference between revisions of "Comparing AT bindings"

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MUST BE CONVERTED TO A TABLE AND MOVED TO BINDINGS
  
 
These notes are a summary of opinions expressed in the ski.com.au  forums.
 
These notes are a summary of opinions expressed in the ski.com.au  forums.

Revision as of 11:06, 5 February 2011


MUST BE CONVERTED TO A TABLE AND MOVED TO BINDINGS

These notes are a summary of opinions expressed in the ski.com.au forums.

Trekkers

Recommended use

First steps away from the lifted slopes, with lower capital outlay

Pros

Works as an adaptor on your normal downhill bindings and boots

Can hire

Cheaper than dedicated set-up

Cons

Heavy, awkward, discouraging to use

Still expensive enough to not be good value to buy your own

Marker Dukes

Recommended use

Use in bounds with some front country excursions

Jumps and aggressive skiing

Pros

Good downhill performance

Good (best?) release and retention

Robust

Cons

Heavy

It’s a nuisance changing to walk-mode: you have to remove skis, and probably gloves

Marker Barons

(not yet available at time of writing)

Recommended use

As for Marker Dukes

These are a variation on the Dukes, new for 2009. The DIN will be 4-12 so they are more suitable for mere mortals. They are also expected to be lighter and cheaper.

Pros

Expected to be the same as Dukes.

Hopefully lighter and cheaper than Dukes.

More moderate DIN range for non-experts.

Cons

Expected to be the same as Dukes, but not so heavy.

Fritschi/Diamir Freeride Plus

Recommended use

Heavy touring

Jumps and aggressive skiing

Inbounds and out of bounds skiing

Pros

Generally regarded as the benchmark for all-round performance

Light, while still taking standard downhill boots

Higher DIN setting than Fritschi Explorer = better retention

More robust than standard Explorer

Can be used with mountaineering boots

Cons

Some contributors believe release/retention not as safe as other options. Others believe later models have addressed this issue.

Off-the-shelf brakes do not fit wider waisted skis - adjustment is necessary - can lead to weakness/ overstressing of base plates.

Fritschi/Diamir Explorer

Recommended use

Touring

Pros

Lighter than the Freeride Plus

Easier to use than Dynafit, and take standard boots

Cons

Not as robust as Freeride Plus

Some contributors believe release/retention not as safe as other options, even more than other Fritschis. Others believe later models have addressed this issue.

Naxo NX21

Recommended use

Heavy touring

Inbounds and out of bounds skiing

Pros

Nice walking action because or a double-pivot system

Cons

Not as robust as Freerides

Heavier than Freerides

Dynafit

Recommended use

Alpine Touring and Ski Mountaineering where speed and lightness matter more.

Older TLT model now known as Speed is lightest of all and still a valid option, but cant change modes easily using ski pole, and minimal adjustment for different boots

Not for aggressive extreme skiing with big jumps, but have the scores on the board for technical extreme descents

Pros

Very light, but durable

The benchmark for light AT gear

Tight connection to the ski, more so than other lightweight options

Cons

Need special compatible AT boots, not downhill boots. Limited range of such boots available in Australia.

Awkward to get into

Awkward change from fixed heel to touring, but not the reverse.

Silvretta

Recommended use

Light Alpine Touring where speed and lightness matter more

Pros

Very light; only Dynafits are lighter

Relatively less expensive

Some models can be skied in climbing boots

Cons

Only rudimentary release mechanism. Pure models do at least have some toe release. Older models with a fixed toe bale release at the heel only, with highly questionable safety.

Not as durable as other options